Implications of EPA’s CO2 Regulations for State Renewable Energy Programs and RPSs

The US Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed rule to regulate carbon dioxide under section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act potentially impacts states’ renewable energy programs and policies, including renewable portfolio standards (RPSs). The proposed rule creates opportunities for renewable energy development and for cooperation among states. There are also risks that its implementation could create complications for RPSs, as well as for other programs that rely on renewable energy certificates (RECs).

This webinar will explore the relationship between EPA’s proposed rule and renewable energy. David Farnsworth of the Regulatory Assistance Project will summarize the rule, point out opportunities it creates for state renewable energy policymakers, and explain concerns about preserving the inviolability of RECs.  Matt Clouse and Christopher Sherry of EPA will discuss EPA’s perspective and explore ways in which the proposed rule could benefit renewable energy development. Time will be reserved for questions from the audience.

Presenters:

  • David Farnsworth, Senior Associate, Regulatory Assistance Project
  • Matt Clouse, Director for Renewable Energy Policy and Programs, Climate Protection Partnerships Division, US EPA
  • Christopher Sherry, Policy Analyst in the Climate Change Division, Office of Atmospheric Programs, US EPA

Slides from this webinar are available as a pdf at http://www.cesa.org/assets/Uploads/Combined-slides-6.26.14.pdf

This webinar was a presentation of the Clean Energy States Alliance’s State-Federal RPS Collaborative. For more information about the RPS Collaborative, please visit www.cesa.org/projects/state-federal-rps-collaborative.

Solar Maps as Tools for Advancing Solar Energy

The Clean Energy States Alliance hosted a webinar on Solar Maps as Tools for Advancing Solar Energy. This webinar highlighted cutting-edge map-based tools that have been developed in the District of Columbia, New York, and Ohio. These maps can serve as good models for other states and communities. The webinar focused primarily on maps that show the potential suitability of installing solar on particular buildings within a community. Such maps can help building owners and solar installers know whether a building may be suitable for a solar installation. The maps reduce the transaction costs involved with solar development and save building owners from wasting time pursuing infeasible projects.

The webinar focused on the following maps:

Guest Speakers:

  • Tria Case, University Director of Sustainability at the City University of New York
  • Emil King, Policy Analyst in the Energy Administration at the District of Columbia Department of the Environment

This webinar was hosted by Warren Leon, CESA’s Executive Director.

Slides from this webinar are available as a pdf at: http://www.cesa.org/assets/Uploads/3.5.14-Solar-Map-Webinar-Slides.pdf

HUD Webinar: Energy Investment for Disaster Resilience

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) hosted a webinar on how investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy can be included in disaster recovery activities to increase community resilience through distributed generation, backup storage, and other approaches. Clean Energy Group Senior Finance Director Rob Sanders was a panelist, along with Lynsey Johnson of HUD, and Jason Hartke of the USGBC.

Additional webinar materials are available on the HUD website at: https://www.hudexchange.info/training-events/courses/energy-investment-for-disaster-resilience/.

Accelerating Resilient Power in Connecticut and New York

This webinar highlighted two winning programs from CESA’s 2014 State Leadership in Clean Energy Awards: The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s Microgrid Program, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s CHP Acceleration Program.

Both New York and Connecticut were hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, and both states are working hard to develop their energy resilience. These two programs demonstrate two very different ways of working towards that goal. NYSERDA’s CHP Acceleration Program is making it easier for customers to adopt combined heat and power, and CTDEEP’s Microgrid Program is doing the same for microgrids. Both programs provide additional incentives for facilities that are deemed critical infrastructure and/or that are used as an emergency shelter.

Guest speakers:

  • Dana Levy, Program Manager for Technology Development and On-site Power Applications, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)
  • Veronica Szczerkowski, Microgrid Program Coordinator, Bureau of Energy and Technology Policy, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CTDEEP)
  • Tracy Babbidge, Bureau Chief, Bureau of Energy and Technology Policy, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CTDEEP)

CESA’s report on the 2014 State Leadership in Clean Energy Awards is available here.

Slides from this webinar are available as a pdf at: http://www.cesa.org/assets/Uploads/SLICE-webinar-complete-slides-12.16.14.pdf

Flow Battery Basics, Part 2

This webinar, presented by the Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA)’s Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership (ESTAP), features Andrew Marshall from Primus Power and Tracy Montoya from Raytheon Ktech, who discussed their products and answered questions from viewers. The webinar also featured an introduction to flow battery technology by Dr. Imre Gyuk of U.S. DOE Office of Electricity, and a discussion of flow battery testing and technological readiness by Dan Borneo of Sandia National Laboratories.

Slides from this webinar are available as a pdf at: http://www.cesa.org/assets/Uploads/ESTAP-Webinar-Slides-10.29.14.pdf.

Webinar slides and a video recording of the first webinar in this series, “Flow Battery Basics, Part 1,” are available here.

Flow Battery Basics, Part 1: What They Are, How They Work, Where They’re Used

CESA’s Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership (ESTAP) is hosting a two-part webinar series on flow batteries. In Flow Battery Basics, Part 1, guest speakers from DOE, Sandia National Laboratories, and representatives of two leading flow battery companies, UniEnergy Technologies (UET) and EnerVault, will discuss the technology, including its advantages and disadvantages, costs, safety, life cycle, how it compares with more traditional chemical batteries, what applications it is good for, and some examples of flow battery projects.  ESTAP Project Director Todd Olinsky-Paul will be moderating this webinar. Following the presentations there will be time for Q&A with the audience.

Guest Speakers:

  • Dr. Imre Gyuk, DOE
  • Summer Ferreira, Sandia National Laboratories
  • Charlie Vartanian, UET
  • Craig Horne, Enervault

Slides from this webinar are available as a pdf at: http://www.cesa.org/assets/Uploads/ESTAP-Slides-6.19.14.pdf

Microgrid Technologies: A Guide to CHP, Energy Storage, PV and Fuel Cells

This webinar is intended to convey information to individuals and entities that may submit proposals under Round 2 of Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s Microgrid Grant and Loan Pilot Program. The webinar will include three presentations plus a questions and answers session. Presenters include Tom Bourgeois, Pace Energy and Climate Center; Dan Borneo, Sandia National Laboratories; Paul Michaud, Murtha Cullina LLP; and Veronica Szczerkowski from CT DEEP. The webinar is presented by Clean Energy States Alliance and will be moderated by Todd Olinsky-Paul of CESA.

The technologies to be covered include:

  • Combined Heat and Power (CHP or Cogeneration): This presentation will look at various technologies that are typically used in a CHP application, with emphasis on their potential value proposition for a microgrid project, and a description of the attributes of the site and end-users that make for an economically viable and technically feasible CHP system.
  • Energy Storage: This presentation will look at energy storage for microgrids (what to do, know and watch out for), with a focus on items to consider when adding an electrical energy storage system into a microgrid.
  • Renewable Generation: This presentation will look at the opportunities and benefits of deploying Connecticut Class I renewable energy generation systems, such as solar PV and fuel cells, for inclusion in a microgrid.

Slides from this webinar are available as a pdf at: http://www.cesa.org/assets/Uploads/ESTAP-Webinar-Slides-4.4.14.pdf

Connecticut and Massachusetts Discuss Upcoming Solicitations for Resilient Power and Microgrids

 This webinar, presented by the Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA)’s Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership (ESTAP), features a discussion of upcoming solicitations by the states of Connecticut and Massachusetts for resilient power systems and microgrids. Guest speakers include Alex Kragie and Veronica Szczerkowski at the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CT DEEP), and Amy McGuire at the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (MassDOER). Slides from this webinar are available as a pdf at: http://www.cesa.org/assets/Uploads/ESTAP-Webinar-2.13.14-all-slides.pdf.

Commissioning Energy Storage

CESA’s Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership (ESTAP) hosted a webinar on the process of commissioning an energy storage system. With increasing numbers of energy storage systems being built, it is imperative to have a commissioning plan to insure safe and reliable installations. ESTAP is supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Electricity, and Sandia National Laboratories.

Guest Speakers:

  • Imre Gyuk, US Department of Energy
  • Dan Borneo, Sandia National Laboratories
  • Matt Galland, Sunpower
  • Laurie B. Florence, UL

An audience Q&A followed these presentations. ESTAP Project Director Todd Olinsky-Paul moderated this webinar.

Slides from this webinar are available as a pdf at: http://www.cesa.org/assets/Uploads/ESTAP-Webinar-Slides-5.20.14.pdf

The Economics of Grid Defection

Clean Energy Group’s Resilient Power Project hosted authors of the Rocky Mountain Institute’s recent report, The Economics of Grid Defection. This report looks at areas of the U.S. where solar with battery storage is either currently or imminently at cost parity with grid-purchased electricity, and analyzes the likely impacts on utilities and customers.

Panelists discussed economic trends for solar plus battery systems to enable increased customer options, including the potential for complete defection from the grid. Guest speakers from RMI reviewed key findings from their recent report, as well as early findings from a companion paper looking at the economics of these systems when connected to the grid.

Speakers:

  • Leia Guccione, Rocky Mountain Institute
  • Bodhi Rader, Rocky Mountain Institute
  • James Mandel, Rocky Mountain Institute
  • Todd Olinsky-Paul, Clean Energy Group

Slides from this webinar are available as a pdf at: http://www.cesa.org/assets/Uploads/7.1.14-slides.pdf